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Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Aims and objectives
  3. Assessment
  4. Delegate numbers
  5. Course attendance
  6. Background publications
  7. Notes to training providers
  8. Suggested timetable
  9. Supplementary information
  10. Subject 6 'Role of the TWC' Alternative delivery
  11. End of course examination rules for the course

1. Introduction

This two day course is designed to assist those on site who have responsibility for managing all forms of temporary works.  It is also designed to give confidence to senior management and those who engage with contractors, to reach an assessed standard of knowledge. The course has the support of a number of organisations: Temporary Works Forum, CECA, UKCG, HSE and FMB. The support of these organisations offers transferability of the course within industry. Cskills Awards would like to extend its thanks to John Carpenter (Secretary of Temporary Works Forum) for assisting with course content.

The course gives emphasis throughout tot he importance of communication, co-ordination, co-operation and competency (the '4Cs'), risk management, safety and business relations.

The course allows the Temporary Works Co-ordinator (TWC) to:

  • Understand the need for and duties of a Temporary Works Co-ordinator
  • Understand the role of others
  • Have a detailed knowledge and understanding of BS5975 in respect of this role.

Temporary works are usually safety and business-critical and require careful co-ordination. An accepted way of achieving this is through the adoption of the management process outlined in BS5975 which introduces the Temporary Works Co-ordinator as a key figure. This course explains the role and the overall management context within which it sits. High risk can occur on small as well as larger sites hence understanding the essentials of good safety risk management, as outlined in BS5975, is relevant for projects of all sizes.

This course is not a temporary works awareness course. It is only concerned with the process of co-ordination of temporary works, commonly expressed through the role of the Temporary Works Co-ordinator. Attendance does not infer competency as a Temporary Works Co-ordinator; this comes from a mixture of education, training and experience and should be judged by an appropriate senior individual, usually referred to as the Designated Individual (DI). Training is considered an essential element of Temporary Works Co-ordinator competence.

2. Objectives

The course gives emphasis, throughout, to:
• the importance of communication, co-ordination, co-operation and competency. The ‘4Cs’.
• Risk management: safety and also business related

Allowing the Temporary Works Co-ordinator (TWC) to:
• Understand the need for and duties of a TWC
• Understand the role of others
• Have a detailed knowledge and understanding of BS5975 in respect of this role.

This course is not a temporary works awareness course. It is only concerned with the process of co-ordination of temporary works, commonly expressed through the role of the Temporary Works Co-ordinator. Attendance does not confer competency as a Temporary Works Co-ordinator.

3. Assessment

The method of assessment will be by multiple-choice questions at the end of the course as well as being expected to be interactive during the course.

4. Delegate numbers

The maximum number of delegates per course will be 20.

5. Course attendance

Delegates are required to attend both sessions, since without full attendance and achievement in the examination the Temporary Works Co-ordinator Training Course cannot be made.

Delegates must attend the days in order and, where not on consecutive days, must complete the course within two weeks. Delegates unable to attend both days due to extenuating circumstances (e.g. certificated sickness) will need to enrol onto a new course in order to maintain continuity of learning outcomes and attend both days again.

It is expected that experienced and competent Temporary Works Co-ordinators will attend this course.  Competence comes from a mixture of education, training and experience and should be judged by an appropriate senior individual, usually referred to as the Designated Individual (DI). Training is considered an essential element of Temporary Works Co-ordinator competence.

6. Course publications

This course, including its group work and exercises, is constructed around BS5975:2008 +A1:2011. For Open Courses Delegates should bring a copy with them in order not to be significantly disadvantaged. For in-house courses it is expected that the Tutor will tailor the course around the organisation procedures, providing they are comprehensive and follow the philosophy of BS5975. In these cases delegates will need a copy of their own procedures. In the absence of adequate procedures delegates will need a copy of the BS itself.

Although the following is not mandatory, delegates may find the following useful

• BS EN12811-1:2003  Temporary works equipment. Scaffolds. Performance requirements and general design

• BS EN12812:2008. Falsework ‐performance requirements and general design

• BS EN12813:2004. Temporary works equipment. Load bearing towers of prefabricated components. Particular methods of structural design

• NASC TG20.08 plus supplement 1

• NASC TG9:12

• BS7121 suite of standards

• Bragg, S.L., Interim report of the advisory committee on falsework. 1974 HMSO and the final report issued in 1975.

• Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2007 and CDM Approved Code of Practice (ACoP)  L144  HSE Books or download

• Safe erection, use and dismantling of falsework

• http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cis56.pdf

• Concrete Centre

• CSG005  Concrete Society

• ICE manual of health and safety in construction. Thomas Telford 2010

• Temporary Works: Principles of Design and Construction. Thomas Telford 2010

• Retention of Masonry Facades – best practice guide  C579, CIRIA, 2003

• Formwork – a guide to good practice, 3rd Edition CS030, The Concrete Society, 2012

• Competency of the TWC (TWf advice note) at www.twforum.org.uk

7. Notes to training providers

Training providers may make minor adjustments to the programme to meet delegate needs so long as the aims and objectives of the course are met.

Tutors will develop detailed notes, case studies and exercises from the outline syllabus, suitably indexed and presented for the delegate to take away on completion.  It is essential that the underlying theme of proportionate risk management, from a safety and business critical perspective is present throughout.

Notes should expand on, and explain the background and in particular the role of the TWC as set out in BS5975 as well as giving explanation to other aspects of the Module. 

Copies of the proposed programme changes, if any, must be submitted prior to course delivery.
The examination paper number will be notified when the course booking is accepted by the Site Safety Plus department. 

8. Suggested timetable

Time Subject Content
20 minutes 1.0 Course administration Registration and domestics in accordance with venue requirements.
90 minutes

2.0 Function of Module

A brief overview of temporary works and their function

Why temporary works is important:

- Safety Critical: legal requirements

- Business Critical

Roles

- Client, Contractors, Designers (permanent works and temporary works), CDM-Cs, APs, TWCs, TWSs, DI

- Contract and statute

What are temporary works - definition of temporary works (BS5975 or organisations TW procedure)

Important to stress range of reasons and that it is about managing risk in an integrated manner. Important also to stress the benefits of early consideration or temporary works in terms of savings in time and money

Describe in relation to temporary works and their relationships. Statute overrides contract. An opportunity to initiate discussion on practical issues, points of concern etc.

90 minutes

3.0 Background

- Bragg

- BS5975:2008 +A1:2011

Product

- Standard solutions

- Condition

- Sourcing

Important to understand the background and how this is relevant today. Key Bragg conclusions.

E.g. BS12811 etc.

Examples of standard solutions; gaps in information provided; provenance.

90 minutes

4.0 Statutory aspects to temporary works

- Regulations: CDM (including Part iv), WAH, PUWER, LOLER

- Statutory aspects of

Inspections

Stability (above and below ground)

Design (scaffold)

Important to know how 'temporary works' fits into these wider requirements. Corporate requirements.

As these are statutory they are separated out; Contractual and statutory responsibilities may differ.

60 minutes

5.0 Avoiding Failure

People, Process and Product (the 3Ps)

People

- Competence (corporate and individual)

Process

- Clarity of responsibility

- Procurement

- Identifying site-wide issues and planning ahead

- Design and checks

- Installation

- Use

- Maintenance

- Dismantling

Product

- Standard solutions

- Condition

- Sourcing

 

The '3Ps gives emphasis to the issues which maintain a safe place to work. Most failures occur due to a failing in People or Process

Importance of ensuring the right persons are involved, supplemented by supervision where there is a shortfall

Identifying interfaces

Importance of good practice: adequate time, good documentation, competent organisations

Key points e.g. design brief, stability (specifically lateral stability); need for a review as distinct from a check

Examples of standard solutions; gaps in information provided; provenance.

240 minutes

6.0 Role of the TWC

(source:BS5975 or organisation's procedure if in-house course)

Appointment

Role

TWS interface and role

Written appointments; role of Principal/Main Contractor, DI

Syndicate exercises are particularly useful in this section to enhance the programme.

A key part of the Module. TWC duties can be presented as set out in the BS (chronologically) or grouped by subject/action type to give alternative presentation: See Section 9 below

TWC needs to understand when, or if , a TWS should be appointed, the appropriate procurement method, and how to specify the role of TWS.

60 minutes

7.0 Management

Basis of good management

Administration: benefit of good temporary works systems

The Register

As with Section 6 above, on an external course this would be based on generic guidance following BS5975 principles but for an in-house course for an organisation with a temporary works procedure which conforms to BS5975 then this section should be based on that procedure.

Communication, Co-operations, Co-ordination, Competency. Planning ahead.

Requirements and tips for easy compilation and use.

120 minutes

8.0 Key aspects of different temporary works types e.g.

- Excavations

- Falsework

- Formwork

- Earthwork

- Working Platforms and Haul Roads

- Cranes (Tower, Crawler & Mobile)

- Scaffolding

- Pressure Testing

- Site Establishment

- Demolition

This is a 'what to watch for' exercise.

A spread is required but tailored to suit cohort of delegates e.g. civil or building.

For each type of temporary works the complete process is considered in terms of identifying requirements, options for temporary works solutions, preparation of design briefs, designs and checks (including check categories), construction, inspection, use and dismantling of the temporary works

30 minutes 9.0 Examination  
40 minutes 10.0 Course review/closure  
Total 14 hours End of course  

9. Suppplementary information

The role of the Temporary Works Co-ordinator is explained in the latest version of BS5975. This is as follows (Table taken from TW/11/27 'Competencies of the TWC', which in turn is taken from the British Standard.) The table is available on the Temporary Works forum website.

a Co-ordinate all temporary works activities
b Ensure a temporary works register is established and maintained
c Ensure that the various responsibilities have been allocated and accepted
d Ensure that a design brief is prepared with full consultation, is adequate and is in accordance with the actual situation on site
e Ensure that any residual risks, identified at the design stage, assumed methods of construction, or loading constraints identified by the designer of the permanent works are included within the design brief
f Ensure that a satisfactory temporary works design is carried out
g

Ensure that a design check is carried out by someone who was not involved in the originaldesign; this should include:

- Concept

- Structural adequacy

- Compliance with the brief (*2)

h Where appropriate , ensure that the design is made available to other interested parties e.g. the CDM-C or the designer of the permanent works
i Register or record the drawings calculations and other relevant documents relating to the final design
j Ensure that those responsible for on-site supervision receive full details of the design, including any limitations and guidance notes associated with it and prepare a specific method statement
k Ensure that checks are made at appropriate  stages
l Ensure that any proposed changes in materials or construction are checked against the original design and appropriate action taken
m Ensure that any agreed changes, or correction faults, are correctly carried out on site
n Ensure that during the use of temporary works all appropriate maintenance is carried out
o After a final check which is satisfactory, ensure a permit to load (bring into use) is issued by either the TWC or TWS, issue formal permission to load/bring into use
p When it has been confirmed that the permanent structure has gained adequate strength and/or stability , ensure a permit to unload (take out of use) the temporary works is issued by either the TWC or TWS
q Ensure that a documented safe system of work is in place and implemented for the dismantling of any temporary works
r Ensure that any relevant information for the health and safety file is transmitted to the CDM co-ordinator
s In all cases, ensure that the TWSs are operating in accordance with the approved procedures

(*2) Also suggested by TWf) 'interdependency with all other components which form a part of the structural system'. It is important that someone is formally required to give an overview of the design (which may be carried out by more than one party) to ensure it is robust as an entity.

10. Subject 6 'Role of the TWC' Alternative delivery

Subejct 5 forms a large part of course content, the duties from the table in Section 9 (above) have been grouped together under logical headings as an alternative to chronological delivery. (Column 3 in reference to table above.)

 

A Co-ordination  
  Co-ordinate all temporary works activities a
  Comment: needs good understanding of the whole picture and in particular 'interface' issues. Include permanent works designer where relevant.  
B Records  
  Ensure a temporary works register is established and maintained b
  Register or record the drawings calculations and other relevant documents relating to the final design i
  Ensure that any relevant information for the health and safety file is transmitted to the CDM co-ordinator r
  Comment: good systems can make an onerous task simple and effective  
C Design  
  Ensure that a design brief is prepared with full consultation, is adequate and is in accordance with the actual situation on site d
  Ensure that any residual risks, identified at the design stage, assumed methods of construction, or loading constraints identified by the designer of the permanent works are included within the design brief e
  Ensure that a satisfactory temporary works design is carried out f
 

Ensure that a design check is carried out by someone who was not involved in the original design, this should include:-

- Concept

- Structual adequacy

- Compliance with the brief (*3)

g
  Where appropriate, ensure that the design is made available to other interested parties e.g. the CDM-C or the designer of the permanent works  
  Comment: a good design brief is essential. It requires experience to write. Item f should include liaison with CDM-C and ensure ERIC is adopted.  
D Information flow  
  Ensure that those responsible for on-site supervision receive full details of the design, including any limitations and guidance notes associated with it and prepare a specific method statement j
  Comment: information flow is a key item in managing safely. Differentiate between a 'check' and a 'review'. See SCOSS advice on review  
E Checks  
  Ensure that checks are made at appropriate stages k
  Ensure that any proposed changes in materials or construction are checked against the original design and appropriate action taken l
  Ensure that any agreed changes, or correction of faults, are correctly carried out on site m
  Ensure that during the use of temporary works all appropriate maintenance is carried out n
  After a final check which is satisfactory, ensure a permit to load (bring into use) is issued by either the TWC or TWS, issue formal permission to load/bring into use o
F Permits etc  
  When it has been confirmed that the permanent structure has gained adequate strength and/or stability, ensure a permit to unload (take out of use) the temporary works is issued by either the TWC or TWS p
G Procedures  
  Ensure that the various responsibilities have been allocated and accepted c
  Ensure that a documented safe system of work is in place and implemented for the dismantling of any temporary works q

(*3) Also (suggested by TWf) 'interdependency with all other components which form a part of the structural system'. It is important that someone is formally required to give an overview of the design (which may be carried out by more than one party) to ensure it is robust as an entity.

11. End of course examination rules for the course

Refer to section 3 Registering courses and marking Delegates' performance

The examination paper is compulsory and consists of 25 multiple-choice questions selected by Cskills Awards. It forms the basis of assessment as to whether or not a delegate has successfully achieved a satisfactory level of understanding to be awarded the Temporary Works Co-ordinator Training Course (TWCTC) certificate. The examination is an open book examination. The examination lasts for 30 minutes and must be completed within this time. The examination pass mark is 72%.

Where a delegate has achieved 64%–68% in the examination, the delegate may re sit the multiple-choice examination by attending another course on the final day and subsequent arrangements will be at the delegate’s own expense. The training provider must make the arrangements with the delegate and ensure that the same examination paper is not used twice. The delegate must re-sit the examination within 90 days of the last day previously attended. A charge may be made to the delegate; however, this fee is left entirely to the discretion of the training provider. The training provider may also have additional costs to be recovered from the delegate and this should be agreed in advance.

Should the delegate fail for a second time, that person will need to attend a full two-day course again.

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